A Plant A Day Till Spring – Day 25 – Raspberry

“Champagne Raspberry” – Spring 2013 – Hamnett Place Community Garden – Wilkinsburg, PA

“A Plant a Day till Spring” will highlight one plant a day, starting on the winter solstice (December 21, 2013)… And ending on the vernal equinox (March 20, 2014)… If all goes to plan I will be starting with old Snowdrop photos from 2013… And ending with new photos of Snowdrops in 2014…

Seven Days of Fruit and Berries

Rubus is a large genus of flowering plants in the rose family… Rosaceae… Raspberries, blackberries, and dewberries are common members of the genus… Most of these plants have woody stems with prickles like roses… Spines, bristles, and gland-tipped hairs are also common in the genus… The Rubus fruit, sometimes called a bramble fruit, is an aggregate of drupelets… The term “cane fruit” (or “cane-fruit”) applies to any Rubus species or hybrid which is commonly grown with supports such as wires or canes… Including raspberries, blackberries, and hybrids such as loganberry, boysenberry and tayberry…

© chriscondello 2013

“Red Raspberry” – Spring 2013 – Hamnett Place Community Garden – Wilkinsburg, PA

Raspberries are traditionally planted in the winter as dormant canes… Although planting of tender, plug plants produced by tissue culture has become much more common… A specialized production system called “long cane production” involves growing canes for a year in a northern climate where the chilling requirement for proper bud break is attained, or attained earlier than the ultimate place of planting… These canes are then dug, roots and all, to be replanted in warmer climates where they quickly flower and produce a very early season crop… Plants are typically planted in fertile, well-drained soil… Raspberries are usually planted in raised beds/ridges…

The flowers can be a major nectar source for honeybees and other pollinators…

Raspberries are very vigorous and can be locally invasive… They propagate using basal shoots (also known as suckers)… They can sucker new canes some distance from the main plant… For this reason… Raspberries spread well, and can take over gardens if left unchecked… Raspberries are often propagated using cuttings… Using cuttings preserves the genotype of the parent and is the preferred method of propagation when making large plantings…

The fruit is harvested when it comes off the torus/receptacle easily and has turned a deep color (red, black, purple, or golden-yellow, depending on the species and cultivar)… This is when the fruits are ripest and sweetest…

plant petunias and question everything – chriscondello

New To writing and never had to site sources before… These “Plant a Day Till Spring” posts are simply intended to kill time until spring… My source is Wikipedia.org… The photography is all my own… And I am adding my own information… But much of this is just related from the web…

This website and all of the information presented within is provided free by the author… Me… It is my sole opinion and is not representative of anyone other than myself… Although this website is free… I sell prints of my photography here – www.society6.com/chriscondello – or you can contact me directly with questions at – c.condello@hotmail.com – Although it isn’t a requirement… It helps…

Remember to tip… My Bitcoin digital wallet address is – 1JsKwa3vYgy4LZjNk4YmPEHFJNjPt2wDJj

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